Archives

  • “Among many things that Ray has taught me are five rules for happiness. So the first one is living in the moment. The second is that it’s better to be loving than to be right, and if you’re in a relationship, you know how challenging that can be. The third one is to be a spectator to your own thoughts, especially when you become emotional, which is almost impossible to do. The fourth is to be grateful for at least one thing every day, and the last is to help others every chance you get. So I’m incredibly fortunate to have people in my life like that.”

    -- Jeff Werner, CEO of LinkedIn in interview with the NY Times

  • “When you don’t have any money, you get really good at making money. When you have a lot of money, you get really good at spending money.”

    -- Glen Coates, CEO and founder of Handshake, paraphrasing entrepreneur Jason Fried (of 37Signals)

  • “After we launch a new feature, I keep a close eye on how many people are using it. If it’s unpopular, we’ll discontinue it and try something else. Every feature has some maintenance cost, and having fewer features lets us focus on the ones we care about and make sure they work very well. For every new feature we add, we take an old one out.”

    -- David Karp, via Bijan Sabet

  • “Usage is like oxygen for ideas. You can never fully anticipate how an audience is going to react to something you’ve created until it’s out there. That means every moment you’re working on something without it being in the public it’s actually dying, deprived of the oxygen of the real world.”

    -- Matt Mullenweg, in “1.0 Is The Loneliest Number”

  • “Entrepreneurship is about living a few years of your life like most won’t, so that you can live the rest of your life like most can’t.”

    -- Unknown

  • “Progress has little to do with speed, but much to do with direction.”

    -- Unknown

  • “Innovation is almost insane by definition: most people view any truly innovative idea as stupid, because if it was a good idea, somebody would have already done it. So, the innovator is guaranteed to have more natural initial detractors than followers.”

    -- Ben Horowitz, in “Why We Prefer Founding CEOs”

  • “The Master of the art of living makes little distinction between his work and his play, his labor and his leisure, his mind and his body, his education and his recreation, his love and his religion. He hardly knows which is which. He simply pursues his vision of excellence in whatever he does, leaving others to decide whether he is working or playing. To him he is always doing both.”

    -- James Michener, as quoted in a speech by Alison Mass

  • The abuse of words like innovation, disruption, game changing and breakthrough is killing us. We’re tripping over our own egos, lost in the ignorance of romance for the vagaries of pseudo-thinking associated with these words. The more often people in a company use this word, the less likely anything worthy of that label is actually happening, as it’s often the confused and the desperate who believe simply saying a word again and again like a magic spell causes anything at all to happen.

    -- Scott Berkun, from “Stop Saying Innovation”

  • Focus, Focus, Focus!
  • Windows knocked him off the main stage for 10 years; then the Internet seemed to sideline him; not to mention that serious business people (along with many others) thought he was nutty; then he had problems with the SEC (and not insignificant ones); then he nearly died.

    -- Michael Wolff, talking about Steve Jobs

  • What to do with your millions
  • “I try to buy stock in businesses that are so wonderful that an idiot can run them. Because sooner or later, one will.”

    -- Warren Buffett

  • “Design almost invariably involves compromise…. Rarely can the designer simply optimise one requirement without suffering losses elsewhere…. There are no established methods for deciding just how good or bad solutions are, and still the best test of most design is to wait and see how well it works in practice. Design solutions can never be perfect and are often more easily criticised than created, and designers must accept that they will almost invariably appear wrong in some ways to some people.”

    -- Bryan Lawson, from “How Designer’s Think”